Beauty

21 Types of Bangs to Consider If You’re Ready to Take the Plunge

Different types of bangs can instantly transform your face and hairstyle, but chopping off that much length in one snip can be scary. If you’re seriously contemplating the cut, don’t worry: according to Harry Josh, a hairstylist and the creator of Harry Josh Pro Tools, “there’s some form of face-framing bang that will work on almost everyone.” Not to mention, inspiration for hairstyles with bangs has never been more plentiful. 

In recent months, celebrities like Sydney Sweeney, Zoë Kravitz, and Billie Eilish have been serving all kinds of covetable fringe looks, and with nostalgic beauty trends like Y2K and ’70s hairstyles seeing a renaissance, it’s not surprising you have bangs on the brain. Blunt and fringe bangs, thick and thin bangs, long and short hair with bangs — there are countless cuts and lengths to choose from. The first step is to find your ideal fringe. The next is to commit.

However, if the hesitation over whether or not you should get bangs stems from how much time styling bangs will add to your already established hair care routine, it’s not as much of an undertaking as you might think. “Bangs shouldn’t take too much time to style. Two to three minutes, tops,” says Los Angeles-based hairstylist Clariss Rubenstein

To eliminate some of your intimidation, Rubenstein recommends asking your stylist to give you a lesson on how to style them as they go through the steps themselves. It might take some trial and error, but after about a week of practice, you’ll be a pro.

If you’ve read this far and are still on the fence, you’re in luck. Below, top hairstylists break down everything you need to know about finding your best match, as well as how to fix bangs at home in a way that looks professionally styled. And if you have bangs and you’re tired of them, we’ve also got advice on how to grow them out. 


Meet the experts:


Things to consider before getting bangs:

It’s a Commitment

Bangs shouldn’t tack on an extra 20 minutes to your styling routine, but gone are the days where you roll out of bed, run a brush through your hair, and go. “The fringe is the first thing you see,” says Jennie Roberts, a U.K.-based textured hairstylist and educator for Curlsmith. “It’s got to look well.”

Maintenance Matters

Schedule a professional bang trim every six weeks, Josh advises. Many salons offer it as a complimentary service between regular appointments. If you’re going to take matters into your own hands (which we really don’t recommend, but understand is sometimes necessary), don’t do anything drastic, and be sure to use salon scissors on dry hair.